Dental Health

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Google Maps location for West Queanbeyan Veterinary Hospital

West Queanbeyan Veterinary Hospital
158 Uriarra Road
Queanbeyan
NSW 2620

Phone:
(02) 6297 5542
Fax:
(02) 6299 3594

Dental Health

Why should you look after our pet’s teeth?

  • Dental disease is PREVENTABLE
  • Dental disease is a major cause of bad breath and tooth loss.
  • It prevents localized pain in the mouth and gums
  • preventable reduction in appetite and fussy eating habits due to oral discomfort
  • Prevention of life-threatening diseases such as Heart Disease, Kidney/Liver Disease, Bacterial Blood Infections (Septicaemia.)

  • Facts

    Unfortunately, the incidence of dental disease in our pets is prevalent.

    Some dental problems are caused by genetic factors but the majority of them are in fact dietary related.  Our dogs and cat’s teeth were not designed to eat soft pre-prepared easy to chew food.  They need bones or an equivalent to mechanically clean their teeth – just like we humans use a tooth brush!

    • Dental disease is a major cause of bad breath and tooth loss.
    • It prevents localized pain in the mouth and gums
    • preventable reduction in appetite and fussy eating habbits due to oral discomfort
    • Prevention of life-threatening diseases such as Heart Disease, Kidney/Liver Disease, Bacterial Blood Infections (Speticaemia.)

    Recommendations

    West Queanbeyan Veterinary Hospital recommends the following for the long-term health of your pet and their teeth.

    PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN CURE

     

    RAW meaty bones (never give cooked bones) at least twice a week for dogs.  The bigger the bone the better – however remove the bone once all flesh and gristle has been removed to prevent tooth damage on the hard core – this may only take some dogs half an hour to reach that point.

    RAW Chicken wings and necks at least twice weekly for cats and chunks of meat not bite sized pieces.  Be aware however that raw chicken can carry salmonella so use fresh

    Human quality, don’t leave it out for hours if your cat doesn’t eat it and if young children are around considering other alternatives.  Raw chicken can be placed in boiling water for 3 to 5 minutes to reduce this risk – this does not cook the bone.

    Good quality dry food rather than tinned (professional quality dry foods now include ‘dental defence’ type ingredients and some consist of large and slightly fibrous kibbles to help mechanically clean the teeth).  Hills T/D is one of these – available for both dogs and cats and is genuinely effective – especially in cats and small dogs that won’t eat raw meat and bones.

    There are a range of products now available to help such as water additives like ‘dental fresh’ and dental chews such as ‘Greenies’.

    Regular scale and polishes under anaesthetic will need to be done by your veterinarian, if your pet refuses to eat the above!

    Brushing your dogs or cat’s teeth remains the ideal way of preventing dental disease if your pet will tolerate it!